LumiCycle

0,00 

Luminometry for Circadian Biology

LumiCycle performs high-throughput luminometry on self-luminous tissues, such as those from transgenic animals containing the luciferase gene.

 

Clear

Description

DescriptionLumiCycle 32LumiCycle 96LumiCycle In VivoReference
The systems are equipped with photon-counting photomultiplier tubes, each selected for low dark counts and high sensitivity in the green portion of the spectrum at which luciferase emits light.

The LumiCycle 32 and 96 fit inside a standard incubator. An internal fan circulates the incubator air to maintain the proper temperature within the chamber. The temperature is therefore as stable as the incubator can make it. The turntable and photon counting are fully automated. System setup and operation is straightforward. Online help files are included with the software.

In addition to its high-precision photon counting hardware, LumiCycle has the most flexible and easy-to-use software for the collection and analysis of circadian rhythms in luminometry data.

  • Start and stop each counting channel asynchronously. You may, for example, start one experiment with 10 samples on one day, and start a second experiment with 22 samples the following day, stop the first experiment 5 days later and start yet a third set of dishes in their place.
  • Interrupt the data collection to perform experimental manipulations on the samples (such as adding a drug). Once the treatment is complete, LumiCycle will pick up exactly where it left off.
  • Flexible counting schedules, from once per hour, to once per minute.
  • View records during the data collection process. A single window shows data for all 32 or 96 channels at once. Double-click on one of the graphs to view the data in greater detail (top figure).
  • Analysis program (bottom figure) automatically compensates for baseline shifts and signal attenuation over the course of the trial. The dominant circadian period and phase can then be extracted (red curve). View periodograms and actograms, calculate phase shifts, extract periods with spectral or periodogram methods.
  • Superimpose multiple records for comparison and figure preparation.
  • Calculate rhythm parameters for the complete record, or for multiple subsets of the record. If, for example, a treatment is given halfway through a record that is expected to create a period or phase change, the two halves of the record can be analyzed separately and a phase shift calculated.
  • While data collection is in progress, you may repeatedly copy the growing data files onto another computer (via a floppy or the network) and analyze the data collected so far for period and phase. Data collection continues uninterrupted until the end of the experiment.
  • Extracted periods and phases can be exported to a text file for later manipulation in Excel or other statistics programs.
  • LumiCycle 32 Raw or baseline-subtracted records can be exported to ClockLab for further analysis using periodograms, actograms, and activity profiles.

LumiCycle 32 – 32-Channel Luminometer for Circadian Biology

LumiCycle performs high-throughput luminometry on self-luminous tissues, such as those from transgenic animals containing the luciferase gene. The system is equipped with 4 photon-counting photomultiplier tubes, each selected for low dark counts and high sensitivity in the green portion of the spectrum at which luciferase emits light. 32 tissue samples, each in a 35 mm Petri dish, can be counted at one time. 8 dishes share each photodetector using a turntable device that alternately brings each dish under the detector, one at a time. (Specifications.)

The LumiCycle apparatus fits inside a standard incubator. An internal fan circulates the incubator air to maintain the proper temperature within the chamber. The temperature is therefore as stable as the incubator can make it. The turntable and photon counting are fully automated. System setup and operation is straightforward. Online help files are included with the software.

Two-color option. With the 2-color adaptation, colored filters can be placed on 2 of the photomultipliers so that 16 samples can be recorded simultaneously in 2 different colors. To create the image on the right, fibroblasts were transfected with Bmal-Nluc and Per2-Fluc, and recorded with a 550 nm long-pass filter on one PMT and 500 nm short-pass filter on the other. Optical filters can be easily changed by the user, or they can be removed for recording in the standard, non-color mode.


In addition to its high-precision photon counting hardware, LumiCycle has the most flexible and easy-to-use software for the collection and analysis of circadian rhythms in luminometry data.

  • Start and stop each counting channel asynchronously. You may, for example, start one experiment with 10 samples on one day, and start a second experiment with 22 samples the following day, stop the first experiment 5 days later and start yet a third set of dishes in their place.
  • Interrupt the data collection to perform experimental manipulations on the samples (such as adding a drug). Once the treatment is complete, LumiCycle will pick up exactly where it left off.
  • Flexible counting schedules, from once per hour, to once per minute.
  • View records during the data collection process. A single window shows data for all 32 channels at once. Double-click on one of the graphs to view the data in greater detail (top figure).
  • Analysis program (bottom figure) automatically compensates for baseline shifts and signal attenuation over the course of the trial. The dominant circadian period and phase can then be extracted (red curve). View periodograms and actograms, calculate phase shifts, extract periods with spectral or periodogram methods.
  • Superimpose multiple records for comparison and figure preparation.
  • Calculate rhythm parameters for the complete record, or for multiple subsets of the record. If, for example, a treatment is given halfway through a record that is expected to create a period or phase change, the two halves of the record can be analyzed separately and a phase shift calculated.
  • While data collection is in progress, you may repeatedly copy the growing data files onto another computer (via a floppy or the network) and analyze the data collected so far for period and phase. Data collectioncontinues uninterrupted until the end of the experiment.
  • Extracted periods and phases can be exported to a text file for later manipulation in Excel or other statistics programs.
  • Raw or baseline-subtracted records can be exported to ClockLab for further analysis using periodograms, actograms, and activity profiles.

LumiCycle 32 Specifications

Tissue holders 35 mm dishes (Falcon)
Capacity 32 dishes
Detectors 4 Photomultiplier tubes (photon counting mode)
Each tube records alternately from 8 dishes
Dark counts <10/sec @ 20 deg. C
20/sec typical @ 35 deg. C
Optical Filters
for color separation
Diameter: 25 mm
Thickness: 3 mm
Long Pass (from Edmund Optical)
Short Pass (from Edmund Optical)
Operating temperature Up to 37 deg. C – ambient humidity
(as set by incubator or environmental room)
Dimensions 14″ W x 13.5″ H x 14″ D (35.5 x 34.3 x 35.5 cm)
Front loading
Count period 10 s – 1 hr program selectable
System requirements Windows XP/7/8/10
1 USB port
1280 x 1024 resolution monitor recommended
Analyses Actogram
Periodogram
Spectral (sinusoidal fit and damped sinusoidal fit)
Phase shift (double sinusoidal fit to defined periods)
Baseline subtraction (low-order polynomial)
Warranty One year, parts and labor

LumiCycle Composite Window

The LumiCycle analysis program allows you to superimpose multiple records for comparison and display purposes. Almost every feature of the graph can be manipulated for creating presentation-quality figures.

LumiCycle – 96-Channel Luminometer for Circadian Biology

Like LumiCycle 32, LumiCycle 96 performs high-throughput luminometry on self-luminous tissues, such as from PER-LUC mutants. LC96 records from 4 24-well plates. The system is equipped with 8 photomultiplier tubes, each selected for low dark counts and high sensitivity in the green portion of the spectrum at which luciferase emits light. A turntable and moving PMT mounting alternately brings each sample under its detector. (Specifications.)

LumiCycle 96 is identical in size to LumiCycle 32. The apparatus fits inside a standard incubator. An internal fan circulates the incubator air to maintain the proper temperature within the chamber. The temperature is therefore as stable as the incubator can make it. The turntable and photon counting are fully automated. System setup and operation is straightforward. Online help files are included with the software.

Comparison of 96-channel and 32-channel systems:

  • In LC96, 12 samples share each PMT (instead of 8), so that each sample is counted for 2/3 less time during each hour.
  • The PMTs in LC96 are “end-on” instead of “side-on”.
  • The PMTs in LC96 have a larger window, which increases the background signal (dark counts) by about 2-fold, but also increases the signal itself by a comparable amount.
  • The light-tight cabinets are identical in size.
  • LC96 uses two USB slots on the host computer (instead of one).
  • File formats and analysis software are identical.
  • Both systems have very low cross-talk between channels. In LC96 cross-talk is less than 1 part in 1000.

In addition to its high-precision photon counting hardware, LumiCycle has the most flexible and easy-to-use software for the collection and analysis of circadian rhythms in luminometry data. As with LC32, recording is continuous; recording on each 24-well plate can be started and stopped independently.

  • Start and stop each counting channel asynchronously. You may, for example, start one experiment with 10 samples on one day, and start a second experiment with 22 samples the following day, stop the first experiment 5 days later and start yet a third set of dishes in their place.
  • Interrupt the data collection to perform experimental manipulations on the samples (such as adding a drug). Once the treatment is complete, LumiCycle will pick up exactly where it left off.
  • Flexible counting schedules, from once per hour, to once per minute.
  • View records during the data collection process. A single window shows data for all 32 channels at once. Double-click on one of the graphs to view the data in greater detail (top figure).
  • Analysis program (bottom figure) automatically compensates for baseline shifts and signal attenuation over the course of the trial. The dominant circadian period and phase can then be extracted (red curve). View periodograms and actograms, calculate phase shifts, extract periods with spectral or periodogram methods.
  • Superimpose multiple records for comparison and figure preparation. 
  • Calculate rhythm parameters for the complete record, or for multiple subsets of the record. If, for example, a treatment is given halfway through a record that is expected to create a period or phase change, the two halves of the record can be analyzed separately and a phase shift calculated.
  • While data collection is in progress, you may repeatedly copy the growing data files onto another computer (via a floppy or the network) and analyze the data collected so far for period and phase. Data collection continues uninterrupted until the end of the experiment.
  • Extracted periods and phases can be exported to a text file for later manipulation in Excel or other statistics programs.
  • Raw or baseline-subtracted records can be exported to ClockLab for further analysis using periodograms, actograms, and activity profiles.

LumiCycle 96 Specifications

Tissue holders 24-well plates (Falcon)
Capacity 4 plates (96 samples)
Detectors 8 Photomultiplier tubes (photon counting mode)
Each tube records alternately from 12 samples
Dark counts <10/sec @ 20 deg. C
20/sec typical @ 35 deg. C
Operating temperature Up to 37 deg. C – ambient humidity
(as set by incubator or environmental room)
Dimensions 14″ W x 13.5″ H x 14″ D (35.5 x 34.3 x 35.5 cm)
Front loading
Count period 10 s – 1 hr program selectable
System requirements Windows XP/7/8/10
2 USB ports
1280 x 1024 resolution monitor recommended
Analyses Actogram
Periodogram
Spectral (sinusoidal fit and damped sinusoidal fit)
Phase shift (double sinusoidal fit to defined periods)
Baseline subtraction (low-order polynomial)
Warranty One year, parts and labor

LumiCycle Composite Window

The LumiCycle analysis program allows you to superimpose multiple records for comparison and display purposes. Almost every feature of the graph can be manipulated for creating presentation-quality figures.

LumiCycle In Vivo

LumiCycle In Vivo is designed to record PER-LUC light emissions from awake behaving animals placed in

a standard mouse cage and infused with luciferin analogs. (Specifications).

For over a decade, it has been possible to record PER-LUC light emission from isolated tissues and cells. As methods and signals improve, it is now possible to record light emission from intact, behaving animals, opening up a wide range of experiments on the interactions among the clocks in different organs operating in their natural environment. LumiCycle In Vivo is a simple, robust apparatus for recording luminescence from intact animals, while simultaneously recording activity, monitoring light, temperature, and humidity within the chamber, and controlling the lights in infinitely programmable skeleton schedules.

 

Luminescence data from a PER-LUC mouse fitted with a luciferin mini-pump (Courtesy Prof. Mary Harrington, Smith College).

  • Two PMTs for even sensitivity across the cage area.
  • Red-shifted PMT sensitivity to accommodate the absorption of green photons by the intervening tissues.
  • Activity input for recording through a running wheel or IR motion sensor.
  • Programmable LED lights in each chamber for creating skeleton light schedules.
  • Light levels, temperature and humidity recorded continuously for animal care and use monitoring.
  • High-capacity internal fan for 15 air changes per hour.
  • Up to 8 units can be run on one computer. Recording on each unit can be started and stopped independently, and each can be given its own light schedule.
  • Data can be viewed and analyzed in the LumiCycle Analysis or ClockLab Analysis programs.

The LumiCycle In Vivo front panel, showing ongoing collection of counts for 4 animals (2 PMTs), together with temperature, humidity, light levels (Lux) and the current setting for the LED illuminator. The graph below is the second-by-second photon count for the currently selected channel (4).

LumiCycle In Vivo: Specifications

Maximum Cage Dimensions:

  • Length: 13.25″ (33 cm)
  • Width: 8.5″ (21 cm)
  • Height: 7.5″ (19 cm)

# of PMTs: 2

PMT Dark counts:

  • < 100/sec @ room temperature.
  • Minute-to-minute standard deviation in dark counts less than 2/sec.

PMT Spectral sensivity:

LumiCycle In Vivo Light Control

The intensity of the LED lights inside of the LumiCycle chambers can be programmed in an endless variety of schedules by creating any number of ramps and steady levels. The schedules for the lights in each chamber can be set independently. In this chamber (selector at top left) the lights are ramped up over the course of two hours starting at 6:00 AM, and then ramped down again starting at 4:00 PM.

  • The schedule is adjusted by grabbing and dragging the cursors or line segments.
  • New cursors can be added and deleted for infinitely flexible schedules with multiple phases.
  • The duration of the schedule can be set to non-24-hour periods (Period control, bottom center).
  • Here, a single schedule is being repeated for each day. Multiple waveforms can be set, with each one used for one day and then discarded (not shown). The schedule can be set in advance and programmed to start at a later time.

Papp, S.J., Huber, A.L., Jordan, S.D., Kriebs, A., Nguyen, M., Moresco, J.J., Yates, J.R., and Lamia, K.A. (2015). DNA damage shifts circadian clock time via Hausp-dependent Cry1 stabilization. eLife 4.

Pilorz, V., Cunningham, P.S., Jackson, A., West, A.C., Wager, T.T., Loudon, A.S., and Bechtold, D.A. (2014). A novel mechanism controlling resetting speed of the circadian clock to environmental stimuli. Current biology 24, 766-773.

Kim, J.Y., Kwak, P.B., and Weitz, C.J. (2014). Specificity in circadian clock feedback from targeted reconstitution of the NuRD corepressor. Molecular Cell 56, 738-748.

Du, N.H., Arpat, A.B., De Matos, M., and Gatfield, D. (2014). MicroRNAs shape circadian hepatic gene expression on a transcriptome-wide scale. eLife 3, e02510.

Chaves, I., van der Horst, G.T., Schellevis, R., Nijman, R.M., Koerkamp, M.G., Holstege, F.C., Smidt, M.P., and Hoekman, M.F. (2014). Insulin-FOXO3 signaling modulates circadian rhythms via regulation of clock transcription. Current biology 24, 1248-1255.

Nangle, S.N., Rosensweig, C., Koike, N., Tei, H., Takahashi, J.S., Green, C.B., and Zheng, N. (2014). Molecular assembly of the period-cryptochrome circadian transcriptional repressor complex. eLife 3, e03674.

Lin, S.T., Zhang, L., Lin, X., Zhang, L.C., Garcia, V.E., Tsai, C.W., Ptacek, L., and Fu, Y.H. (2014). Nuclear envelope protein MAN1 regulates clock through BMAL1. eLife 3, e02981.

Buhr, E.D., and Van Gelder, R.N. (2014). Local photic entrainment of the retinal circadian oscillator in the absence of rods, cones, and melanopsin. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111, 8625-8630.

Mian Zhou, Jinhu Guo, Joonseok Cha, Michael Chae, She Chen, Jose M. Barral, Matthew S. Sachs & Yi Liu (2013). Non-optimal codon usage affects expression, structure and function of clock protein FRQ. Nature 495:111-5.

Xu Y, Ma P, Shah P, Rokas A, Liu Y, Johnson CH. (2013) Non-optimal codon usage is a mechanism to achieve circadian clock conditionality. Nature. 495:116-20.

A. Jagannath, Rachel Butler, S. I.H. Godinho, Y. Couch, L. A. Brown, S. R. Vasudevan, K. C. Flanagan, D. Anthony, G. C. Churchill, M. J.A. Wood, G. Steiner, G. Ebeling, G. Hossbach, J. G. Wettstein, G. E. Duffield, S. Gatti, M. W. Hankins, R. G. Foster, and S. N. Peirson (2013) The CRTC1-SIK1 Pathway Regulates Entrainment of the Circadian Clock Cell. 154:1100 1111.

Cao R, Robinson B, Xu H, Gkogkas C, Khoutorsky A, Alain T, Yanagiya A, Nevarko T, Liu AC, Amir S, Sonenberg N. (2103) Translational control of entrainment and synchrony of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock by mTOR/4E-BP1 signaling. Neuron 79:712-24.

Daisuke Ono, Sato Honma & Ken-ichi Honma (2013) Cryptochromes are critical for the development of coherent circadian rhythms in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus Nature Communication 4:1666.

Seung-Hee Yoo, Jennifer A. Mohawk, Sandra M. Siepka, Yongli Shan, Seong Kwon Huh, Hee-Kyung Hong, Izabela Kornblum, Vivek Kumar, Nobuya Koike, Ming Xu, Justin Nussbaum, Xinran Liu, Zheng Chen, Zhijian J. Chen, Carla B. Green, Joseph S. Takahashi (2013) Competing E3 Ubiquitin Ligases Govern Circadian Periodicity by Degradation of CRY in Nucleus and Cytoplasm. Cell 28:1091 1105

Laura Lande-Diner, Cyril Boyault, Jin Young Kim, and Charles J. Weitz (2013) A positive feedback loop links circadian clock factor CLOCK-BMAL1 to the basic transcriptional machinery PNAS 110:16021-16026.

Zhipeng Zhoua, Xiao Liua, Qiwen Hua, Ning Zhanga, Guangyan Suna, Joonseok Chac, Ying Wanga, Yi Liuc, and Qun Hea (2013) Suppression of WC-independent frequency transcription by RCO-1 is essential for Neurospora circadian clock. PNAS 10:E4867-E4874

Hinard, V., Mikhail, C., Pradervand, S., Curie, T., Houtkooper, R.H., Auwerx, J., Franken, P., and Tafti, M. (2012). Key electrophysiological, molecular, and metabolic signatures of sleep and wakefulness revealed in primary cortical cultures. Journal of Neuroscience 32:12506-12517.

Jackson, C.R., Ruan, G.X., Aseem, F., Abey, J., Gamble, K., Stanwood, G., Palmiter, R.D., Iuvone, P.M., and McMahon, D.G. (2012). Retinal dopamine mediates multiple dimensions of light-adapted vision. Journal of Neuroscience32:9359-9368.

Tong, X., Buelow, K., Guha, A., Rausch, R., and Yin, L. (2012). USP2a protein deubiquitinates and stabilizes the circadian protein CRY1 in response to inflammatory signals. Journal of Biological Chemistry 287:25280-25291.

Sellix, M.T., Evans, J.A., Leise, T.L., Castanon-Cervantes, O., Hill, D.D., DeLisser, P., Block, G.D., Menaker, M., and Davidson, A.J. (2012). Aging differentially affects the re-entrainment response of central and peripheral circadian oscillators. Journal of Neuroscience 32:16193-16202.

Wang, Z., Wu, Y., Li, L., and Su, X.D. (2012). Intermolecular recognition revealed by the complex structure of human CLOCK-BMAL1 basic helix-loop-helix domains with E-box DNA.Cell researchepub 12/2012

Khan, S.K., Xu, H., Ukai-Tadenuma, M., Burton, B., Wang, Y., Ueda, H.R., and Liu, A.C. (2012). Identification of a novel cryptochrome differentiating domain required for feedback repression in circadian clock function. Journal of Biological Chemistry 287:25917-25926.

Takahiro J. Nakamura, Wataru Nakamura, Shin Yamazaki, Takashi Kudo1, Tamara Cutler, Christopher S. Colwell1, and Gene D. Block1(2011) Age-Related Decline in Circadian Output.Journal of Neuroscience, 31:10201-10205.

Maki Ukai-Tadenuma, Rikuhiro G. Yamada, Haiyan Xu, J rgen A. Ripperger, Andrew C. Liu, Hiroki R. Ueda (2011) Delay in Feedback Repression by Cryptochrome 1 Is Required for Circadian Clock Function. Cell 144:268-281.

Savelyev, S. A., Larsson, K. C., Johansson, A. ., Lundkvist, G. B. S. (2011) Slice Preparation, Organotypic Tissue Culturing and Luciferase Recording of Clock Gene Activity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus. Journal of Visualized Experiments 48:e2439.

Nicholas C. Foley, Tina Y. Tong, Duncan Foley, Joseph LeSauter, David K. Welsh, Rae Silver (2011) Characterization of orderly spatiotemporal patterns of clock gene activation in mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus. European Journal of Neuroscience 33:1851 1865.

Ethan D. Buhr, Seung-Hee Yoo and Joseph S. Takahashi (2010) Temperature as a Universal Resetting Cue for Mammalian Circadian Oscillators. Science 330:379-385.

Biliana Marcheva, Kathryn Moynihan Ramsey, Ethan D. Buhr, Yumiko Kobayashi, Hong Su, Caroline H. Ko, Ganka Ivanova, Chiaki Omura, Shelley Mo, Martha H. Vitaterna, James P. Lopez, Louis H. Philipson, Christopher A. Bradfield, Seth D. Crosby, Lellean JeBailey, Xiaozhong Wang, Joseph S. Takahashi and Joseph Bass (2010) Disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 leads to hypoinsulinaemia and diabetes. Nature 466: 627 631.

Mijung Yeom, Julie S. Pendergast, Yoshihiro Ohmiya, and Shin Yamazaki (2010) Circadian-independent cell mitosis in immortalized fibroblasts. PNAS 107:9665-9670.

Isabelle Schmutz, J rgen A. Ripperger, St phanie Baeriswyl-Aebischer and Urs Albrecht (2010) The mammalian clock component PERIOD2 coordinates circadian output by interaction with nuclear receptors. Genes & Development 24:345-357.

Markus Stratmann, Fr d ric Stadler, Filippo Tamanini, Gijsbertus T.J. van der Horst and J rgen A. Ripperger (2010) Flexible phase adjustment of circadian albumin D site-binding protein (Dbp) gene expression by CRYPTOCHROME1. Genes & Development 24:1317-1328.

Jorge Mendoza, Paul P vet, Marie-Paule Felder-Schmittbuhl, Yannick Bailly and Etienne Challet. (2010) The Cerebellum Harbors a Circadian Oscillator Involved in Food Anticipation.Journal of Neuroscience, 3018:94-1904.

Eric E. Zhang, Andrew C. Liu, Tsuyoshi Hirota, Loren J. Miraglia, Genevieve Welch, Pagkapol Y. Pongsawakul, Xianzhong Liu, Ann Atwood, Jon W. Huss III, Jeff Janes, Andrew I. Su, and John B. Hogenesch (2009) A Genome-wide RNAi Screen for Modifiers of the Circadian Clock in Human Cells. Cell 139:199-210.

Laurent Meijer, Leandros Skaltsounis, Emmanuel Mikros, Prokopios Magiatis, Carl Johnson (2009) 3′,6-Substituted Indirubins and Their Biologicial Applications. US Patent Application20110136808.

Julie E. Baggs, Tom S. Price, Luciano DiTacchio, Satchidananda Panda, Garret A. FitzGerald, John B. Hogenesch (2009) Network Features of the Mammalian Circadian Clock. PLoS Biology7:e1000052.

Naohiro Kon, Tsuyoshi Hirota, Takeshi Kawamoto, Yukio Kato, Tadashi Tsubota and Yoshitaka Fukada (2008) Activation of tGF- /activin signalling resets the circadian clock through rapid induction of Dec1 transcripts. Nature Cell Biology 10:1463-1469.

Andrew C. Liu, Hien G. Tran,, Eric E. Zhang, Aaron A. Priest, David K. Welsh and Steve A. Kay (2008) Redundant Function of REV-ERB and and Non-Essential Role for Bmal1 Cycling in Transcriptional Regulation of Intracellular Circadian Rhythms. PLoS Genetics 4:e1000023.

Steven A. Brown, Dieter Kunz, Amelie Dumas, P l O. Westermark, Katja Vanselow, Amely Tilmann-Wahnschaffe, Hanspeter Herzel, and Achim Kramer (2008) Molecular insights into human daily behavior. PNAS 105:1602-1607

Wen-Ning Zhao, Nikolay Malinin, Fu-Chia Yang,, David Staknis, Nicholas Gekakis, Bert Maier, Silke Reischl, Achim Kramer & Charles J. Weitz (2007) CIPC is a mammalian circadian clock protein without invertebrate homologues.Nature Cell Biology 9:268-275.

Natsuko Inagaki, Sato Honma, Daisuke Ono, Yusuke Tanahashi, and Ken-ichi Honma (2007) Separate oscillating cell groups in mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus couple photoperiodically to the onset and end of daily activity. PNAS 104:7664-7669.

Mariko Izumo, Takashi R. Sato, Martin Straume, Carl Hirschie Johnson (2006) Quantitative Analyses of Circadian Gene Expression in Mammalian Cell Cultures. PLoS Computation Biology, 2:1248-1261.

Guo-Xiang Ruan, Dao-Qi Zhang, Tongrong Zhou, Shin Yamazaki, and Douglas G. McMahon (2006) Circadian organization of the mammalian retina. PNAS 103:9703-9708.

Katja Vanselow, Jens T. Vanselow, P l O. Westermark, Silke Reischl, Bert Maier, Thomas Korte, Andreas Herrmann, Hanspeter Herzel2, Andreas Schlosser and Achim Kramer (2006) Differential effects of PER2 phosphorylation: molecular basis for the human familial advanced sleep phase syndrome (FASPS). Genes and Development, 20:2660-2672.

Alec J. Davidson, Martin Straume, Gene D. Block, Michael Menaker (2006) Daily timed meals dissociate circadian rhythms in hepatoma and healthy host liver. International Journal of Cancer 118:1623-1627.

Martha Hotz Vitaterna, Caroline H. Ko, Anne-Marie Chang, Ethan D. Buhr, Ethan M. Fruechte, Andrew Schook, Marina P. Antoch, Fred W. Turek, and Joseph S. Takahashi (2006) The mouse Clock mutation reduces circadian pacemaker amplitude and enhances efficacy of resetting stimuli and phase response curve amplitude. PNAS103:9327-9332.

Fukuhara C, Yamazaki S, Liang J. (2005) Pineal circadian clocks gate arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene expression in the mouse pineal gland. Journal of Neurochemistry93:156-62

Chiaki Fukuhara, Shin Yamazaki and Jian Liang (2005) Pineal circadian clocks gate arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene expression in the mouse pineal gland. Journal of Neurochemistry 93:1471-4159.

Yoo SH, Ko CH, Lowrey PL, Buhr ED, Song EJ, Chang S, Yoo OJ, Yamazaki S, Lee C, Takahashi JS. (2005) A noncanonical E-box enhancer drives mouse Period2 circadian oscillations in vivo.PNAS 102:2608-13.

David K. Welsh, Seung-Hee Yoo, Andrew C. Liu, Joseph S. Takahashi, and Steve A. Kay. (2004) Bioluminescence Imaging of Individual Fibroblasts Reveals Persistent, Independently Phased Circadian Rhythms of Clock Gene Expression. Current Biology 14:2289-95.

Mariko Izumo, Carl Hirschie Johnson and Shin Yamazaki (2003). Circadian gene expression in mammalian fibroblasts revealed by real-time luminescence reporting: Temperature compensation and damping. PNAS100:16089-16094.

 

Additional information

LumiCycle Model

LumiCycle 32 Color, LumiCycle 96, LumiCycle In Vivo